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26 Sep 2014 - The Huffington Post: Know What's Inside Your Kids' Apps

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The Huffington Post

The CEOs of some of the world’s leading food and non-alcoholic beverage companies, including Coca-Cola, McDonald's and Nestlé, have agreed on a new policy for responsible advertising to children.

The commitments, created in conjunction with members of the International Food and Beverage Alliance (IFBA), form part of a broader package of measures sent in a letter to World Health Organization director general Dr Margaret Chan, which will guide companies’ health and wellness strategies going forward.

The package includes a commitment to product reformulation and innovation as well as a common global approach to including nutritional information on pack, at point of sale and through other channels by the end of 2016.

Two of the key changes outlined include expanding the current global policy to cover all media, including radio cinema, direct marketing, mobile and SMS marketing, interactive games, DVD/CD-ROM and product placement.

In addition, certain marketing techniques, such as licensed characters, movie tie-ins and celebrities that appeal to children under 12 will only be permitted for products meeting the “better-for-you” criteria.

The new standards for marketing to children, which come into force by the end of 2016, will constitute the minimum global criteria for all IFBA companies.

“The major food and beverage companies have strict controls in place on how they communicate with younger audiences. This latest strengthening of the IFBA global policy demonstrates the extent to which IFBA members are taking their responsibilities seriously when it comes to marketing to children,” said Stephan Loerke, managing director of the World Federation of Advertisers.

The new criteria will be used to update local “pledge programme” initiatives, which are based on the IFBA global policy but which also bring in local companies in order to extend market coverage.

Other companies that have agreed to the commitments include Ferrero, General Mills, Grupo Bimbo, Kellogg's, Mars, Mondelez International, PepsiCo and Unilever.

Source: The Drum...

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Global

On 16 September, Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI) urged Sunny Delight, Pizza Hut and Amazon to stop promoting unhealthy food and drinks at schools. The NGO called on the companies to set nutrition standards for food and beverages marketed in school-related contexts....

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United States

On 16 September, Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI) urged Sunny Delight, Pizza Hut and Amazon to stop promoting unhealthy food and drinks at schools. The NGO called on the companies to set nutrition standards for food and beverages marketed in school-related contexts....

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United States
United States

On 16 September, online customer-review service Yelp announced having agreed to pay $450,000 to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) to settle charges that the company accepted registration to its services from children under 13 through its apps....

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United States

Today AEf is publishing a comprehensive literature review on digital marketing communications and children, prepared by Dr Barbie Clarke, of...

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26 Sep 2014 - The Huffington Post: Know What's Inside Your Kids' Apps

We all know that kids love apps. From a parent's perspective, apps can provide a much more interactive, and educational experie

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The Huffington Post

16 Sep 2014 - The Guardian: Know What's Inside Your Kids' Apps

One of the big challenges for children’s app developers is the reluctance of many parents to pay upfront for apps, even if they distrust...

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The Guardian

06 Jul 2014 - The Guardian: Know What's Inside Your Kids' Apps

Britain's technology companies are struggling to attract a new generation of mobile-savvy&nb

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The Guardian

27 Feb 2014 - The Wall Street Journal: Know What's Inside Your Kids' Apps

Teens as young as 13 are sometimes shown risqué ads on their Facebook feeds. What can parents do to protect their kids? WSJ's Jeff Elder...

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The Wall Street Journal